Category Archives: organisation

Nappy Stack

IMG_0070_2With just a week’s notice my son invited me to go to his partner’s baby shower.  The second thought to cross my mind (the first,  ‘Ooh, lovely’) was to wish I hadn’t rushed to give them the Retro Orchard Puff Quilt!IMG_0037

 

 

 

But it was only a fleeting thought and based only on the time remaining to complete a gift to give on the day.  I had a few ideas, one of them being the Nappy Stack I’d seen on Pinterest. So I set about searching. I found lots of lovely possible gifts but no sign of the very one I wanted.

It took just a little while for the light to dawn and for me to realise the language barrier issue! For Nappy Stack read Diaper Stack.  Of course! As soon as I re-worded my search there it was.                                And,1827-Diaper_Stacker-1 hey presto one click and I was on the Sew 4 Home site.  You can sign up for a weekly email from Sew 4 Home and I remembered that was where I actually first saw this. There are some great projects on the site and you can pin direct from the email link so it’s easy to keep the projects you like the look of.

This one caught my eye initially because grey and yellow are the nursery colours. As it happens I’ve been stashing away a little collection of yellows and greys ready for a quilt. I chose some Michael Miller ‘Here Kitty Cat’ fabric and some Riley Blake grey and white chevrons. I also think it’a a pretty nifty idea and much nicer than just having packs of nappies hanging around the nursery. I’m a sucker for idiosyncratic storage.

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So, here is all the fabric cut and ready to sew.  The instructions on the Sew 4 Home tutorial are really clear and every step is accompanied by a clear photograph. Excellent! They also add links to  technique tutorials like sewing curves and making piping. Useful if you come across things you haven’t done before.

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Opening for the hanger hook.

Basically the stack is made in two parts: the top hanger cover and the bottom sack. There are some fiddly bits, like the opening for the hanger hook in the top section, and of course, that piping.

The binding might have been a bit of a fiddle too but for my recently purchased Estone biased binding makers. imagesThis was the first chance I’d had to have a go with one of these and although the pattern didn’t call for bias it was magic for folding the binding evenly. Cheap as chips at £4.20 for a set of 4 sizes! You push your binding strip through and press it as it comes out folded at the other                   end. No more burned fingers!IMG_0064_2Here’s the main body part with the binding sewn on and the pockets in place.IMG_0066_2And here’s the top part with the hanger inside.IMG_0068_2And here’s the nappy stack complete with nappies, wipes and creams in the pockets.

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Wooden hangers from ‘Hangerworld’!

Oh! Just one other thing. You will need a child’s, preferably wooden, coathanger. I didn’t have any so it was a case of thank goodness for Amazon and next day delivery, we have a handy family subscription to Prime. Living out in the sticks brings shopping challenges so it’s worth having.  Who would ever have imagined there is somewhere called ‘Hangerworld?

Nonnie had organised a lovely baby shower for her sister.  And there was an amazing cake made by her sister-in -law.  It made me giggle.IMG_0071

Here is the link to the tutorial on Sew 4 Home. I know now exactly where to find it. I’m going to need it, I’ve already started a second one at the request of my daughter.

Update

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Here is the second Nappy Stack. Made with two fabrics from the lovely Nature Trail collection by Bethan Janine for

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Dashwood Studios. They consistently come up with fabrics I adore, in colours that just make my mouth water.

 

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And a pic of the binding in the making. Next time I do it I’ll add a decent sequence.

Please leave a comment, it’s good to know there’s someone out there!

Peg Bags

Exactly a year ago last week, February half term, me and my sister and our sisters-in-law  met up for a girls day out in the lovely little seaside town of Aberdovey.

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We drank coffee and talked; we

walked along the sea front and talked; we ate lunch in one of the pubs along the sea front …

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and talked and browsed every one of the little shops and talked!

In one shop we talked about peg bags, well the conversation had to have a few mmmm…..  exciting topics, didn’t it?  There were some pretty ones there and my sister-in-law commented that she needed a new peg bag. Well you can probably imagine the outcome. I, of course, said ‘Don’t buy one, I’ll make one’.  Sister-in-law  2 says ‘I’d like one too.’ Not a problem. Well, such an easy thing to make! I knew I’d be making at least 3. And thinking about it I needed one as well. Make that two, our caravan peg bag has seen better days.

But even I didn’t think it would take me a year! I thought about it. I thought about it a lot. I planned and I looked at them on Pinterest, I even made a dedicated peg bag board!                                                                   From my Pinterest board (click through to take a look at them all):

I love the vintage shoulder bag one from Marmalade Rose blogspot; the washing line appliqué from ‘Aiming for swan like’  really appealed to me and the button hanging idea from ‘Love me sew’ got me thinking about alternatives to coat hangers. The Cath Kidston bird house was one of the commercial ones I thought was fun.

I was very dedicated to the idea of making them; I sourced the right sized hangers but never quite got around to ordering them; I became extraordinarily interested in examining them whenever I saw one in a shop and I contemplated how I wanted them to hang.

Well I’m pleased to say that the planning was worth it and at last I have a design that I really like and that is easy to make and that has a hanging system that I’m really pleased with. The trigger hook means that the bag doesn’t come off the washing line no matter how hard the wind blows, and it can blow here on the West Wales coast!

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I bought two different types of hooks, the round ended ones are the best.

The Prototype: Making the front.                                                                                     The opening is just the right size and in just the right place.

I bought a broom handle and found trigger hooks in the farmers stores, there were no eyelets there so I turned to trusty Charlie’s Stores.IMG_1762 I did get Jeff to cut the broom handle into sections for ease and speed and when the sewing was done to help screw the eyelets in. The compressed wooden broom handles are extraordinarily tough!

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Here is the first finished  peg bag.

 

 

The only adjustment to the design was to shave a quarter of an inch off the dowel. I’ve made all the bags I’d planned and they have been quick and easy.

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If you are in need of a new peg bag and  would like to make this one I’ve added a tutorial here.

 

 

Chicken and Egg.

Whenever I set out to realise one of my ideas I find myself thinking back to Design Technology staff meetings at school! Our talented curriculum leader, Martha,  put us through our paces thinking through the design, make, review process. Well, whenever I make my ‘prototype’ there is always plenty to think about in the review part of the proceedings! There certainly was for this little fabric container … or pot …. or box. I’m not really sure what to call it. Ideas on a postcard  (or a comment here) please.

What to call it? Any ideas?
What to call it? Any ideas?

When I saw ‘Chicken and Egg’ in Aberdashery I knew what I wanted to make with it right away. I’d been planning some little round containers for a while. Initially the containers in my mind’s eye had turn down tops not lids but then the lid popped into my thoughts. I think I’ll still make a lidless round one, the rectangular ones I made are very versatile and I like them a lot.

Here are my choices from ‘Chicken and Egg’ in the Henley Studio Collection by Makower, lots more lovelies in the collection. Take a peek. These three were obvious choices for me, I’m besotted by the aqua and red combination and have to stop myself choosing it for everything I make. I love the fabric design and I thought the quilting should be kept simple and just let the design speak for itself. So my straight line practise came in useful.

I hope that I can get around to making the improved version soon but at this time of year, well gardening, golfing  and galivanting around the countryside seem to be higher on the agenda. Among my improvements will be making the lid slightly larger. I did make the diameter slightly bigger but not quite enough for the lid to just drop on.

There are other modifications too and as I make the new improved model I’ll have another go at writing a tutorial. All I need is a horrible wet  useful rainy sewing day. Shouldn’t be too long before one of those here in West Wales!

Brighter Baskets

A quick little in-between project to brighten up some storage baskets and add a little colour to the very useful but fairly characterless utility room. Utility by name and utility by nature – at the moment.

Being a skinflint, or maybe just economical with my precious fabric stash I chopped the tops off the original liners and replaced them with seagulls and spots.

The binding around the handle holes is far from perfect, it was a fiddly little job and my fingers have the pinholes to prove it. But they are tidier than the originals.

I didn’t dislike those original liners at all but a little pop of colour is just right.

A little bit of organisation.

Image 07-03-2014 at 22.26I love things to be organised and right now I’m on a bit of a mission to create customised organisation around the house. This week I turned my attention to the little drawer beside my bed. Image 08-03-2014 at 21.55 (1)                          In there are lotions and potions, some bedside necessities; earphones and little book light for sleepless nights; a little supply of very rarely needed night-time medication for just in case (just in case of indigestion, allergy, headache or backache, just in case I don’t want to get out of bed to go looking), and lastly the velux blind remote control so that when I eventually decide morning has arrived I can let the light in without actually getting up. I know exactly what’s in there but I always seem to be scrabbling about to find the very thing I want. So I decided to divide it up and make it easy to lift sections out.

I could have searched around and maybe found some plastic boxes or trays but what fun would that be? What better than to indulge my fabric passion than to  sew some made to measure little fabric baskets. Image 08-03-2014 at 21.56 A little bit of mathematics and I’d worked out that five 6″ x 4″ baskets would fit to perfection.

I love this Makower Henna collection by Beth Studely, I’d seen it here and there and the colours really appealed to me and seeing it in the Little Fabric Bazaar on Facebook was a sign that it was meant to be mine.

Here’s how I made them.

For each basket choose an inner and an outer fabric.                                     From each fabric cut:

* One 6.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle (base)

 * Two 4.5″ x 3′  and Two 6.5″ x  3″ rectangles (sides)

* Cut the same from your chosen wadding

* One 20.5″ x 2″ strip for binding

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Work first with the fabric for the inside. Using quarter inch seams throughout sew the four sides edge to edge, alternate long and short  pieces, and then join them end to end to make the four sides.  Sew the base in place manipulating the turns carefully with the needle down and the presser foot up to get perfect corners. Check that the corners before trimming the points.    For the out outside of the basket lay the wadding on the fabric and sew together in the same way.

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Place the inner basket inside the outer basket.

 

Prepare the binding by pressing a quarter inch turnover at one end of the strip and then pressing in half lengthwise.

With the open edge of the strip edge to edge along  the top of the basket sew in place making sure to tuck the unpressed end inside the pressed end.

Turn the binding over the top edge and pin in place. You can hand sew this in place but I wanted to have a go at invisibly stitching the outside edge so I stitched in the ditch between the binding and the main fabric and I was pleased with the result. The inside seam looks tidy and it was very much quicker than hand stitching. Very useful on some  things but I would definitely still hand finish something like a quilt.

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So a very quick make and I soon had the five to fit perfectly in my drawer and it is so tidy and organised, I think I’ll be able to find everything easily and it looks so much more attractive than plastic boxes.

Oh! I did find the edges are much sharper for a quick press in place once the basket is finished. You could use  a plastic stiffener instead of wadding for a firmer shape.

As an extra I made two more but made the sides of the baskets 1.5″ higher and turned the tops over.  I like these very much and will definitely be making some bigger ones in my quest for organisation perfection!Image 07-03-2014 at 22.28