Tag Archives: house

Peg Bags

Exactly a year ago last week, February half term, me and my sister and our sisters-in-law  met up for a girls day out in the lovely little seaside town of Aberdovey.

images-1

We drank coffee and talked; we

walked along the sea front and talked; we ate lunch in one of the pubs along the sea front …

images-2

and talked and browsed every one of the little shops and talked!

In one shop we talked about peg bags, well the conversation had to have a few mmmm…..  exciting topics, didn’t it?  There were some pretty ones there and my sister-in-law commented that she needed a new peg bag. Well you can probably imagine the outcome. I, of course, said ‘Don’t buy one, I’ll make one’.  Sister-in-law  2 says ‘I’d like one too.’ Not a problem. Well, such an easy thing to make! I knew I’d be making at least 3. And thinking about it I needed one as well. Make that two, our caravan peg bag has seen better days.

But even I didn’t think it would take me a year! I thought about it. I thought about it a lot. I planned and I looked at them on Pinterest, I even made a dedicated peg bag board!                                                                   From my Pinterest board (click through to take a look at them all):

I love the vintage shoulder bag one from Marmalade Rose blogspot; the washing line appliqué from ‘Aiming for swan like’  really appealed to me and the button hanging idea from ‘Love me sew’ got me thinking about alternatives to coat hangers. The Cath Kidston bird house was one of the commercial ones I thought was fun.

I was very dedicated to the idea of making them; I sourced the right sized hangers but never quite got around to ordering them; I became extraordinarily interested in examining them whenever I saw one in a shop and I contemplated how I wanted them to hang.

Well I’m pleased to say that the planning was worth it and at last I have a design that I really like and that is easy to make and that has a hanging system that I’m really pleased with. The trigger hook means that the bag doesn’t come off the washing line no matter how hard the wind blows, and it can blow here on the West Wales coast!

IMG_1812

I bought two different types of hooks, the round ended ones are the best.

The Prototype: Making the front.                                                                                     The opening is just the right size and in just the right place.

I bought a broom handle and found trigger hooks in the farmers stores, there were no eyelets there so I turned to trusty Charlie’s Stores.IMG_1762 I did get Jeff to cut the broom handle into sections for ease and speed and when the sewing was done to help screw the eyelets in. The compressed wooden broom handles are extraordinarily tough!

IMG_1749

 

 

Here is the first finished  peg bag.

 

 

The only adjustment to the design was to shave a quarter of an inch off the dowel. I’ve made all the bags I’d planned and they have been quick and easy.

IMG_4964

 

If you are in need of a new peg bag and  would like to make this one I’ve added a tutorial here.

 

 

Out in the Garden

It’s been all about the garden around here for some months. I had lots of plans for April but then the patio was finished and the May and June weather was too good to miss . So other activities have been  on hold and the gardening went on. I did begin blogging my garden goings-on when we move in last August but somehow I lost momentum. Time to catch up! shedFirst the shed. Looks-like-a-beach-hut shed!I love seeing it from the kitchen window, it manages to cheer up even the dullest day. It fills the weird pointy bit at the top of the garden – and it’s very useful and not the least bit overcrowded (unlike the garage, which is full of stuff).                                                                                                                                              Building the shed was the first thing we did when we moved in. We didn’t exactly plan it that way, we just couldn’t resist the special offers on sheds at the end of the summer. And of course we had a built-in assembly crew of Matt and Tony  when Bethan and Tony came for their first visit to Cae Bach Y Rhiw.

Matt, Tony and Jeff got to grips with the plan and the pieces and then I set to work with the paint brush and the wood stain. No boring  sheds round here! Wondered what the neighbourhood would think but we’d made up our minds long before we put it up.IMG_3191So, here’s the painted (inside and out) shed up at the top of the garden waiting for the winter.   But wait, what about inside? Jeff put up shelves and a retainer rail for the long handle tools and I spent a couple of wet and windy autumn hours cocooned inside. I added a little bit of IMG_3371North Wales (a special little bit)  to the walls. I’d wanted to cover the walls with maps from the first day I thought about a  shed and I will add some more; we have so many old maps.                IMG_3365Next some hooks, old and new,  for the hand tools and bits and bobs. I think I’ve added a few  more over the winter!                                   Then there was the miniature cyclamen that had come with us from London. I’m very attached to this gift from a very good friend on a trip to RHS Wisley many years ago.        It spread all around our

IMG_3367   London garden so I had to bring a bit with us.  It flowered beautifully hanging there in the Greenwich market potholder over the winter and I did manage to  schlep up to the shed to keep it watered.                                                                 I’ll transplant the corm this autumn ready to colonise our new garden I hope.

So the shed sat over the winter waiting, waiting for Stage 2.  The wet winter proved that Stage 2 was needed. As a storage area behind the shed was a right off; a claggy clay bog; soggy, sticky and squelchy and so the improvements were not just cosmetic.                                                                                                                                We began by covering the area behind and to the sides and a strip in front of the shed with a weed barrier membrane and then with golden gravel that we found at Mount Trading. We laid a path at the front and side with Bradstone Carpet Stone (very easy – blocks on  a plastic flexible mat ).

Then we finished it off with a border of Bradstone rope-top edging to keep the gravel in check.  The overall effect is, well, even more     beachy! IMG_1402